Enzyme Levels and Enzyme Digestive Support for CSID

Small Bowel Biopsy Results and Suggested Supplements

Here are the results from my own children’s small bowel biopsies. This is the test that confirmed their CSID diagnosis. If your child has had the small bowel biopsy, ask your doctor for the results so that you can compare them to normal levels.

Function of Lactase

Lactase’s primary function is to break down a type of sugar called lactose. Lactose is a sugar found in milk and other dairy products. As a large sugar compound, lactose cannot be absorbed naturally by your body. In order to metabolize this form of sugar, your body needs lactase to break down lactose into two smaller particles called glucose and galactose. These smaller sugar molecules are more easily absorbed by the cells in your intestine. Without lactase, lactose remains in your digestive tract and cannot be used by your body. http://www.livestrong.com/article/390563-what-are-the-functions-of-the-enzyme-lactase/#ixzz1khYBw3Sn

Functions of Maltase and Sucrase

There are a series of special enzymes that are necessary for the breakdown of specific things. Maltase, invertase, sucrase and diastase are all enzymes that break down specific sugars we ingest. Maltase and diastase break down malt sugar—the kinds of sugars you find in malt liquor and other malted foods. Invertase and sucrase also break down sugar but are better able to break down sucrose or table sugar. Those of us with a high sugar intake especially need these enzymes available. If they can’t do their job, the bacteria in our gut are the only things that have the advantage. Stomach cramps, bloating and gas can result if the sugar-digesting enzymes are inadequate.
Read More: http://www.beta-glucan-info.com/digestive_enzyme_facts.htm

Normal and Abnormal Ranges for Each Enzyme

Lactase: Normal Range 16.5- 32.5, Abnormal is less than 16
Sucrase: Normal Range 29-79.8, Abnormal is less than 25
Maltase: Normal Range 98-223.6, Abnormal is less than 100
Palatinase: Normal Range 4.6-17.6, Abnormal is less than

My son, Parker’s test results at 18 months old (2005):
Lactase: 30.4
Sucrase: 6.6
Maltase: 39.0
Palatinase: 0

My daughter Elora’s test results at age 15 (2008)
Lactase: 21.1
Sucrase: 2.3
Maltase: 50.4
Paltinase: 2.3

Currently, they are both able to tolerate some starch from various sources but an excess of grain-based starches or legumes eventually leads to signs of inflammation and struggling immunity. Only when they are taking digestive and systemic enzymes on a regular basis, are they able to succeed including small portions of high-starch-based foods without symptoms.

Enzymes our Family Has Used with Success Include:

Digestive Enzymes

Carb Digest with Isogest appears to assist with the digestion of disaccharides, the primary deficient enzymes for those with CSID. I have contacted an expert from their company about determining the safety of this product for children. If you have used this product, please let me know if it works! This could be a great Sucraid substitute or complimentary enzyme therapy.

Vital-Zymes™ Chewable contain a full-spectrum of digestive enzymes focused on carbohydrate digestion plus enteric-coated serratia peptidase, a systemic enzyme that may help with supporting various healthy inflammation responses.

Vitazym Digest for those who will and can swallow capsules, or if needed, sprinkle half to one capsule on food. This formula includes a total of 18 enzymes to support digestion of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats.

Consult your medical practitioner regarding proper dosing for children.

Systemic Enzymes

For more on Systemic Enzymes, see the blog post I wrote for Energetic Nutrition HERE.

Vitalzym Extra Strength™

Fibrenza™

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Carbohydrate Malabsorption Medical Articles

I took the next step in organizing all my notes today. At the bottom of my files I came across an article published by HUMAN MUTATION that I must have pulled from a medical database when I was working on my degree a few years back. I noticed the article referred to CSID as “Congenital Carbohydrate Malabsorption”. I then plugged in this phrase to my Google and Bing search engines and discoverd the following online articles that also mention congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency. I am not sure why these article do not appear when searching CSID, but I figured the best I could do to help others trying to find more information would be to include the links here.

As usual, these describe the cause of CSID and little of the treatment, recipes, etc. However, I am providing them to assist in understanding what CSID is, an important factor in understanding why  certain foods should be avoided.

Pediatric Malabsorption Syndromes

Carbohydrate Intolerance

Carbohydrate Malabsorption

Carbohydrate Malabsorption/Intolerance (refers primarily to infants)

Also, there is another CSID page on Facebook called CSID and Us. It seems to have recent activity and is another way for us to connect with other CSID parents.