Paleo Cookbooks

Modified CSID Induction Diet Using Paleo Sugar Detox

Combining CSID and Paleo

In response to a mom who recently contacted me about adjusting her toddler’s diet while waiting for testing and results to confirm CSID, I provided the below information via email. Then I realized other parents might find this helpful. So with a few revisions to apply to a general audience, here is my summarized list of foods to start with while trying to determine a CSID diagnosis or to use after confirmation as an Induction Diet modified from my original.

If you can get the books below as well, I am sure you will find them as helpful as I have. The authors do not mention CSID specifically, so some modifications are needed, but they have far more credibility than I do and Diane speaks on many things I did not feel qualified to mention in my book, though felt strongly about!

Her recipes are not exactly “kid-friendly” but between this book, Danielle Walker’s Against All Grain books and cross-referencing the information I have regarding CSID, I think you will feel some control and direction.

Suggested PALEO Recipe Books

As a disclaimer, I have no connection nor do I receive any compensation for these recommendations — they are simply books and food philosophies that have helped me to feed my family.

Against All Grain

Practical Paleo

21-Day Sugar Detox

Modified 21-Day Sugar Detox Food List for CSID-based Induction Diet

Modified SMOOTHIE RECIPE: amounts of each will vary depending on how many servings, so experiment until you find the right combination. In general: 1 can of coconut milk or 1 cup of almond milk, 1 cup frozen strawberries or blueberries, a handful of greens (kale or spinach), 1/4 cup soaked and drained almonds, 2 tablespoons coconut oil.

Meats, Seafood, Eggs

all okay with minimal processing and no added “flavors” etc. which may contain hidden ingredients.

Vegetables

broccoli, cauliflower (makes a good mashed potato or pasta substitute), celery (cooked in soup for toddlers), cucumber, kale, green beans, bell peppers, sugar-snap peas, spinach, tomato, zucchini or yellow summer squash, spaghetti squash, mushrooms, collard greens, lettuce, artichoke, asparagus.

Fruit

from my best understanding, the sugars in these are fructose only, CSID is a disaccharide deficiency for digesting sucrose and maltose. Fructose is a monosaccharide or single-chain sugar. However, some fruits may irritate until the gut heals, especially those with seeds like strawberries. But you could boil strawberries and strain the seeds out to use the juice for smoothies if you want.

Lemon, lime, and not included in the 21-day sugar detox but should be okay for CSID you can also include: blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, green or red grapes, cherries and add ripe banana(with brown spots) 1/3 per day after the first 10 days if doing okay with the other fruits. I have also heard that granny smith apples and Asian pears are tolerable as a part of the initial diet. Again, wait to see if berries and grapes are tolerable first, and keep in mind serving sizes. A small portion may be tolerable, but too much over a short period of time may not be. This also goes for some allowable starch-based foods.

Nuts/Seeds

Allowing almonds is debatable among CSID philosophies. What I have found is that when no signs of inflammation are present, almonds provide a great source of nutrients, fat, calcium and even iron. To start, soak raw almonds in distilled water overnight.

I make a “porridge” with them — 1 cup soaked and rinsed almonds, 1 cup full-fat coconut milk from a can (Thai Kitchen is the best), 1 ripe banana, 2 tablespoons cinnamon, 1 tsp pure vanilla (no sugar added). Blend and then cook in a pot on the stove on low heat. Add a little almond milk or water if it is too thick. This is not an exact recipe, so you may need to modify amounts.

You may also try the Fake Granola “Almond Cereal Recipe” for children who can chew the ground nuts.

Other nuts, seeds, legumes

that should be okay if they are soaked and added to a smoothie or baked goods: Unsweetened Coconut (MANY health and digestive benefits to coconut if child will/can eat it, so include all forms of coconut whenever you can), pecans, walnuts. Soaked chia or flax seeds may be tolerable after a couple of months and are very beneficial if they can be included once signs are inflammation are gone.

NOTE: NO Peanuts in any shape or form! Peanuts cause inflammation and promote acidity, and if they are not organic, also contain high levels of pesticides and fungus.

Fats and Oils

avocado (1 whole per day if possible, add to smoothies, sliced with a dash of sea salt, layer on lunch meat or over grilled chicken breast or hamburger patties, use in place of mayonnaise and blend with tuna, etc.), coconut oil, olives and olive oil, fats from animal meats like bacon, chicken broth, etc.

Dairy

hold off for now. Once you get the CSID test to determine Lactase levels, you can begin adding some milk-based products. (organic, full-fat, grass-fed dairy if possible)

Beverages

unsweetened, homemade almond milk, coconut milk and coconut cream (full-fat), distilled water (will help to flush out toxins and excess salts) ABSOLUTELY NO JUICE!

Starchy Vegetables or Fruits

These may contain low-levels of natural amounts of sucrose. Add after three weeks success on the above foods: (start with one at a time in small servings once per day over three days, then add another, etc.)

acorn squash, butternut squash, light sweet potatoes (white flesh, creamy skin), pumpkin, green peas, green-tipped banana, grapefruit, apples, carrots, garlic, ginger

Beans

not included in Paleo diet, but are okay for CSID. To start, use dried white Lima or northern beans, soak in distilled water overnight. After cooking, they can be used for soups or blended with onion, garlic, salt and pepper for a white sauce. I’ve used them as pasta substitute too.

Other

homemade broth containing fat, gluten-free mustard, all spices and herbs as long as they are not purchased in a mixed version (some have added fillers or starches), black pepper, sea salt, apple cider vinegar

Digestive Enzyme Links

Print and provide to your doctor and dietitian: Klaire Labs Vital-Zymes

Order from Amazon for best price:Order Vital-Zymes (various distributors, this is just one link)

Although I have done many things to help Parker recover from his eczema and the problems from his food allergies, I believe the regular use of these enzymes over the past year have allowed him to be nearly symptom free as well as to tolerate additional foods. Keep in mind he is 11 years old now and has had several stages of healing and dietary adjustments over the years, but perhaps your daughter will experience better results and not have the addition of food allergies with regular use. Each person is so different, so it is hard to know for sure.

10 year old makes gluten-free cereal

Gluten-Free Granola Recipe Video!

10-Year-Old Parker Demonstrates How He Makes His Own Grain-Free Cereal

Experimenting with a future vlog series, I video-taped Parker for a trial version of what we hope will become several videos where he shares his favorite recipes and talks a little about CSID.

Our hope is that other children will see it is possible to embrace the dietary restrictions and look at the positive things that come from food allergies/food intolerance. Please show your kids, your family and whoever else you feel will benefit from Parker’s perspective.

I have never felt like I was good at video or photography. So, please forgive the lack of professional appearance! If I get good feedback from everyone, we will work on improving the outcome of future videos, but it will help us to know this is something you would like to see more of.

We’d love to hear comments and about what you and your children would like to see in the future! And rest-assured, I will be improving the video quality along the way.

Be advised, review the ingredients of this recipe with your medical provider and dietitian if you (or your child) have any health conditions or concerns.

Food Intolerance and the Immune System

When Undigested Carbohydrates Wreak Havoc

With the popularity of probiotics hitting main stream media, I have to ask why food intolerance is not considered a serious risk to the immune system. I have heard more than one celebrity promoting yogurt or another food containing healthy bacteria state that 70-80% of our immune system is in our gut.

Search “food allergies” vs “food intolerance” and you will likely come across the difference being that food allergies effect the immune system and food intolerance does not. You will also find that the only type of food referenced as “intolerant” is that for lactose, or milk products.

I have not come across a single article or medical reference discussing the fact that people can also be intolerant to sugar and starch. How are people suppose to know that milk is not the only culprit?

Beyond Lactose Intolerance

My research indicates that undigested food—specifically undigested carbohydrates (lactose, sugar and starch)— promote the growth of harmful bacteria in the large intestine and can lead to other health problems.

The message I hear in general is a promotion of adding “good” but no talk of removing the “bad” and this confuses me.

There is no question that diets high in refined flours and sugars create other health problems such as obesity and diabetes. So why is it so difficult to find concrete data and articles regarding the harm these foods also cause in our digestive systems?

This post is more rhetorical than scientific. Aside from research associated with the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, I have not been able to locate additional evidence that omitting harmful carbohydrates in the light of digestive imbalance is also a benefit to the immune system.

I only have my personal experience and knowledge regarding CSID and the inability to break down sugars and starches. If you have a personal experience related to food intolerance and the immune system, I would love to learn about it.

Getting Ready for Spring: The Challenge of Environmental Allergies in Addition to CSID

After over a year of requesting a referral to an allergist to re-test Parker for both food and environmental allergies, he was finally seen by a new allergist at the beginning of February. I had really hoped the test would conclude that at least some of his allergies had subsided. After all, his eczema issues have been cleared up for nearly a year.

The poor guy was so brave as he lie on his belly squirming in response to the skin test. I felt awful for him, but grateful to have a clear picture of his current status, even in the absence of eczema. After the test, the doctor reviewed the results from Parker’s blood test back in June of 2013. I was shocked to learn that the environmental allergies included oak and other tree pollen in addition to learning that his shrimp allergy could be potentially severe.

After a silent prayer of thanks that he had not been exposed to shrimp in recent years, I asked for more details. Apparently the blood test had revealed a significant difference (x100) in antibodies for shrimp–so much that she did not feel comfortable re-testing on the skin along with the other allergens. The doctor then highly recommended Parker have an epi-pin until we could re-test the shrimp in isolation.

Thus the trial and journey of seeking insurance approval, filling out school forms, etc. began. I won’t go into the details here, but I will share that so far, Parker has not been “approved.”

As we prepare for spring and his unavoidable exposure to environmental allergens (dust mites, oak tree pollen, grass pollen), we are taking a pro-active approach. Daily showers after school, protective lotions, a regimen of daily antihistamine, and going back to 100% cotton clothing to allow his skin to breath.

Due to a significant loss in income prior to the holidays, we had to move into a smaller home that has carpet in the bedrooms. This is adding a new challenge of reducing dust-mite exposure as well.

I hope to report the results of our efforts soon. As much as I strive to report success, I have to face that this journey is more often a trial-and-error process. I look forward to your comments and learning how you handle multiple health issues in addition to dietary restrictions.

Possible Allergic Reaction From Handling Offensive Foods

Last night, a thought occurred to me regarding Parker’s tendency to acquire a fever for a day without any other obvious symptoms. This has happened twice in the past few months.

Yesterday, he participated in holiday gingerbread making and homemade play dough at school. I instructed him not to eat anything, but his hands were in contact with the foods he is allergic to (milk, wheat, candy coated with food dye and full of sugar) for several hours. Although he did wake up with a headache, by the time he came home from school he was talkative and did not complain. However, at about 9pm, he spiked a fever of 101 degrees F, and was complaining of a headache again.

This morning, he had no fever, but was complaining of a headache and leg pain again.

I will note that the past couple of weeks have been tough on him. He has not had consistent sleep schedule and just finished as the star of the church Christmas Play. This is amazing given his history the past two years, and I didn’t want a few compromises to his diet to hold him back. After all, his skin looks amazing and he has been in good spirits. However, his intake of “fast food” (aka–canned beans and pre-packaged gluten-free breads) has also increased.

All of this could have slowly worn down his immune system, thus leading to a “reaction” of sorts to the handling of flour, sugar, and milk throughout the day.

This is all conjecture, of course, but I thought I would put the idea out there in case anyone else has experienced strange symptoms that may be related to handling (but not ingesting) offensive foods.

NOTE: To be safe, I did take Parker to the doctor to cancel out infection such as strep throat. The nurse practitioner diagnosed an ear infection, though his other symptoms of neck ache, sore throat, and leg pain do not seem to coincide.

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Maintaining Health Using a Combo of Paleo and Limited Starch/Gluten-Free Alternatives

We’ve gotten into a good routine since school began in August. Parker is doing awesome, is full of energy and his skin looks great. He is ounces away from hitting 60 pounds and his teachers say he is a great student who contributes and interacts regularly.

I am so thankful for the many resources out there that have helped me in this journey. Recently, a few readers have contacted me asking for my interpretation of enzyme levels for themselves or others. Somewhere in the blog archives I think I addressed this, but I will explain my perspective on the issue to be clear.

I am not a scientist or a doctor. However, since my family has personally found success in modifying our diet with a primary focus on individual symptoms rather than enzyme levels, I am encouraging my audience to do the same. Yes, enzyme levels may indicate overall tolerance levels, but it seems each person has many other factors aside from digestive enzymes that can play a part. The goal is to reduce digestive stress, strengthen the digestive process by minimizing toxins and processed foods and including support-based supplements, and to monitor each person for symptoms.

Here is a look back to how the current challenge in our CSID journey began.

May 2013: Parker, age 9 had been suffering from severe eczema since December despite the modified diet I had created (see A Place to Start without Sugar or Starch). Unknown factors surfaced at this time including a lack of Parker taking his digestive supplements with cafeteria-based school lunches. I took Parker to the doctor for the 4th or 5th time and requested an allergy panel to determine if he was reacting to additional foods. The allergy panel came back showing he was now allergic to MILK, WHEAT, EGG WHITES, SHRIMP, COCKROACHES, CEDAR and GRASS POLLEN, CAT and DOG HAIR and DANDER, and PENICILLIN. A previous allergy test when he was six had come back negative for allergies to all of these so this was a new development.

My whole approach had to change. Not only did I need to now eliminate several more foods (milk and eggs had been a staple in his diet up to this point), I also had to find ways to bring healing to his body. Over the years I had learned about conditions such as “leaky gut” that could cause temporary food allergies as well as autoimmune conditions. Not one to simply cover-up symptoms, I was determined to bring my son–once again–into a state of health and well-being by getting to the root of the cause.

REVIEW 2013 POSTS for details on the process and how I ultimately found the best combination for healing Parker’s condition. Time alone was a major factor, but I want to encourage anyone if they stay the course, and keep trying various means, there is hope of healing in the end!

Over the past couple of months, Parker’s symptoms have remained under control event though I have made some exceptions and compromises to his once strict diet. To give hope, I want to summarize his current diet, but please know that EACH PERSON IS DIFFERENT. There are too many factors involved to know these particular foods can all be okay for your individual case. However, know that it is possible to expand the diet once symptoms are under control and methods for curbing mild outbreaks or digestive distress are at hand.

In a typical week, Parker’s normal diet currently includes one of the following for each meal:

BREAKFAST:

  • My homemade NUT CEREAL (raw almonds, cashews, pecans, walnuts plus dates, raw unsweetened coconut, spoonful of honey and cinnamon, and coconut oil pulsed in food processor until it looks like granola) with unsweetened almond milk.
  • Nature’s Path Organic PUMPKIN FLAX GRANOLA with unsweetened almond milk plus VITAL-ZYMES.
  • APPLEGATE FARMS NATURAL SUNDAY BACON, white sweet potato peeled, shredded, and fried in bacon fat, omelet-style eggs yolks with a drizzle of pure maple syrup PLUS vital-zymes
  • SMOOTHIE with frozen blueberries, banana, whole-fat coconut milk (organic Thai Kitchen in a can), half avocado and a handful of greens such as kale or spinach.
  • Occasionally Van’s Gluten-Free pancake or waffles. (NOTE: No more than 2x per week or he begins to show symptoms.)
LUNCH: (Vital-Zymes with every meal containing sugar or starch alternatives)
  • Minimum of 3 non-starchy vegetables (cucumber, spinach, carrots, bell pepper, avocado, tomato)
  • 1 semi-sweet fruit (fruit leather, strawberries, applesauce, pear, apple or grape juice)
  • 1 starch substitute (Schar gluten-free classic rolls, brown rice tortilla, left-over brown rice pasta)
  • Nuts in either a snack-bar form or loose. (Almonds, cashews, walnuts)
  • Occasional exception of organic peanut butter for use with celery or apple slices.
  • Sweet Potato chips, Veggie Sticks
  • APPLEGATE farms deli meats either loose or in a sandwich roll or wrap. Salami, roasted turkey and roast beef are his favorite. He uses mashed avocado as a “mayonnaise substitute”. I am trying to get him to try mustard, but he won’t.
  • Left-over chicken, hamburgers, steak, etc. from previous nights dinner with tossed salad and lemon juice dressing.
  • Wild canned salmon, trout, or tuna with only water or oil (no soy or broth.)
DINNER:
  • Variety of baked or cooked chicken, turkey breast, salmon, sirloin beef burgers, Applegate farms beef hot dogs, pork, ground turkey or grass fed beef.
  • Rice pasta, baked or fried (in olive oil or meat fat) potatoes (white sweet, white regular, red), brown rice or no starch.
  • steamed non-starchy vegetables–green beans, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, winter or summer squash
  • fresh tossed salad with leafy greens, lettuce and a variety of other vegetables
We have tried corn-based products a few times but Parker seems to break out in a rash within a day or so. Some of the above products have traces of corn and don’t seem to present a problem. We also avoid soy products for various reasons but as more of a preference than an necessity.
If Parker begins showing signs of distress (rashes, excess gas, sleeping late, difficulty concentrating) the first thing I do is reduce or eliminate the starchy substitutes (gluten-free foods, grains, potatoes). Then I add a few cups of herbal healing teas (Dandelion tea, Traditional Medicines “Throat Coat”, peppermint and/or chamomile teas) through the week for internal assistance, and apply a thin layer of his prescription eczema cream to inflamed patches of skin. Within 48 hours, these techniques have reversed any symptoms and Parker returns to normal.
Frequent showers and applying protective lotions have also been important in reducing external irritating factors.
I hope this update will help you! I am not sure when I will be back again, as I am in the process of final edits for my fiction book set to release in April of 2015. Eventually, I plan to pull A Place to Start Without Sugar or Starch, complete a full-revision and republish with our updated story, recipes, and resources. It will eventually be less of a “recipe book” and more of an encouraging guide for parents to know they are not alone and to point them in the direction of the many resources I have found helpful and healing in our own journey.

What My Son’s Eczema Has Taught Me About Parenting a Child with Unique Needs

(NOTE: This is a duplicate blog post originally published on http://www.SacramentoParent.com in October 2013. I am sharing it here to reach a broader audience.)

My nine-year old has faced many health challenges in his life, including failure-to-thrive as an infant, seizures through age 4, and food intolerance. However, more recently he has acquired chronic and severe eczema. The last flare-up lasted over six-months due to unknown environmental and food allergies.

My husband and I often ask ourselves why Parker–with the heart and attitude of an angel–must suffer so much. He just wants to be a normal kid and do the things normal kids do.

When his rash began to spread up his neck and onto his face, he also had to endure stares from his classmates and constant comments from strangers such as “Ooo…bad sunburn!” or “What’d he get into?” I even caught a grocery bagger coming up behind us to “sanitize the aisle” after a shopping trip where he was particularly irritated and scratching non-stop as we stood in line.

Thankfully, I was able to pinpoint a few major triggers and after a lot of research, discovered the perfect and individualized combination of natural and prescription remedies to help him heal both inside and out.

After making the difficult and challenging choice to homeschool him for the remainder of the school year, we began finally seeing his condition improve. Today, I am happy to announce my 9-year-old looks great and is back to his old goofy self. He sings and dances in the bathroom as I apply all his creams and ointments post-shower. He can’t wait to be Hawkeye for Halloween and told me earlier this week, “Mom, I do NOT want to be that house that doesn’t give out candy just because I can’t have any!” As soon as he is up for a break from his schoolwork, he is running around the house practicing shooting his arrows.

So what I have learned from all of this?

1. Maybe it’s obvious, but children are resilient. No matter how awful he felt or looked, Parker would still tag along with me on errands, and even to work when needed. Sure, there was a point where he watched a lot of T.V. and didn’t do much. But as soon as his energy returned he was up and ready to face the world. A day doesn’t pass without several hugs and smiles. He knows intuitively I have done all I have in my power to help him get better.

2. People will stare but we don’t have to care. Parker seemed completely oblivious to the looks he got when we were out in public. He didn’t try to “hide” himself and on his good days, actually drew attention singing along to the radio, or making sure I understood exactly which sports car he liked in the parking lot.

3. There is only so much we can do as parents; the rest we have to let go. There is a part of me that wants Parker to get better for good. I am tired of micro-managing every piece of food that touches his mouth and being concerned about his exposure to dust or hair or chemicals in the air. But stressing about all of it just puts everyone in a bad mood. I have my arsenal of remedies at hand, and have resolved to take action as soon as I see a problem arise–instead of going crazy trying to prevent a flare-up in the first place.

4. Normal is a state of mind. What is “normal” anyway? Normal isn’t always a good thing, or even a great thing. As parents of children with unique needs, our normal may look different, but it is still normal to us. So what if we can’t participate in gorging all the Halloween candy next week. At this point, Parker is too excited about trading in his candy for tickets to see Thor to care!

Complete Chewable Enzymes also help with Sucrose Digestion

Back in December (I cannot BELIEVE it has been that long since my last post!) I threw up a quick photo of these new enzymes my sister found. I have not had any time to update everyone on how Parker has fared with this new supplement.

I am happy to say–so far so good! He takes 1 or 2 chewables every time he eats, and sometimes that is 5 or 6 times per day. We got through Christmas with natural-sugar-based and died candies, as well as other foods containing sucrose such as ketchup. BUT before anyone gets excited due to the <$30 per bottle price-tag, the Holidays are over!!

Here is the link to the enzymes: Vital-ZymesTM Chewables , but I am not encouraging the consumption of sugar with their use. There are several other benefits to this product that will support digestion and all the related organ function as a whole. I encourage you to read all the literature on the website before ordering.

I am going to be putting up several more posts on our upcoming 21-day Sugar Detox, based on the best-selling book by Diane Sanfilippo as both Parker and I embark on this cleansing process and make a commitment to a pure Paleo living lifestyle.

Although Parker doesn’t eat sugar (aside from the occasional added ingredient to some packaged foods we are soon putting the taboo on)– he has been craving sweets A LOT lately. I will go into my thinking as to why in future posts. His lingering rashes are one indication he is still experiencing some imbalance. More to come this weekend as I share more about my own personal struggles with food and self-control regarding sugar.

New Enzymes with Sucrase!

My sister came across these while doing research for her nutrition class. We are giving them a try now that Parker’s eczema is under control. Although he still showing some symptoms, we believe it’s mostly environmental. As of yesterday this will be the only digestive support he will take until the bottle is gone.

I will continue to give Parker his antihistamine at night, and apply the prescription ointment for topical treatment. For the record here is a picture I took of him yesterday when we were baking gingerbread cookies gluten free of course.

They are available through various Amazon sellers. Simply search: “Klaire Labs Vital-Zymes chewable”

As you can see he still has some irritation around his eye and some spots on his neck…but huge improvement over all.

Paleo, Eczema and CSID Update

This past month has been overwhelming to say the least. A move, an ill grandparent, continued management of Parker’s symptoms and still working 40 hours per week is not easy!

But I have a few minutes before I am off to my day job to update everyone.

Parker is doing really well at the moment. As you can see, he is ready to take on on new neighborhood tonight–and perfectly fine with our deal that he exchanges all candy for tickets to see the movie Thor in November.

After finally getting in to see an allergist, a serious group prayer intervention (for God is in all of this no matter how I look at it), and completing our move into a healthier home, Parker appears to be on the mend.

One thing I have learned in all this, is I absolutely do not have all the answers and hope that nothing I have posted to this blog indicates as such. I am and have always simply shared what I learn, what works (or doesn’t) work for us, and what I feel could help others in understanding CSID.

This journey with CSID and associated health issues is a CONSTANT LEARNING PROCESS!

Each of us must approach our needs or that of our child’s on an individual basis. New research pops up every day… and honestly I am not in the position to be keeping the world apprised of it at this moment. For example (and if I had time I would site sources)—more research is coming out to discourage the excessive use of fructose in any form aside from its natural form in fruit. But even large amounts of fruit or honey could potentially cause problems for sensitive individuals. I posted a link a while back regarding a finding that I believed at the time was more related to the consumption of highly processed foods.

So please, please take what works for you and do—DO—more research to find what is best for you situation.

Right now, I have my hands full in caring for my son and attempting to complete my many other responsibilities. There are many other blogs and books out there written by experts and professionals that focus on dietary and digestive health for a living. I am not one of those people! In the time since I started this blog, there is much more information available. In a sense, I no longer feel obligated to share everything since much of it is becoming common knowledge. Some of my assumptions and interpretations from a few years ago have come to pass as truth. Others, not so much. For example, I have learned that dairy is probably best to be avoided in all forms. Every member of my family has experienced feeling better by not having milk, cheese, etc. When I have allowed dairy back in the house after we all went without for a while–boy did we all notice a difference!

Again–this is our personal experience I only share to offer a possibility and to encourage whoever reads this to look into the issue for themselves.

Anyway my time is up. I will continue to be available my email to answer specific questions. Please allow a week or so for me to respond. In the meantime, take care and I hope to continue to offer hope if nothing else, to those that come across our public journey of learning how to manage CSID through various means.