The Summer Slide – When Managing Celiac, CSID, and Allergies Goes Awry

With resources running low in recent months, it’s been difficult to feed my family the ideal diet. Summertime makes it all that much harder with teens coming and going and making their own choices regarding what to eat and drink when they are not home.

One thing that has made it difficult to keep taboo foods out of the house is that my oldest son, Dawson, is scheduled for a small bowel biopsy next week, and has doctor’s orders to eat gluten every day in order to confirm his Celiac diagnosis.

On the other hand, Parker (my youngest son and the reason I started this blog in the first place) had repeated food allergy tests done at the start of summer and is no longer “allergic” to wheat, eggs, or milk. Of course at 12 years old, he took that as a green light to eat all the wheat and milk he wants. When his GI Dr. said he didn’t see a problem with it due to the fact Parker has gained 10 pounds in the last year, I didn’t have a lot of ground to stand on to insist on continuing his modified diet.

So, this summer I’ve allowed our family to consume many of the foods I’d normally avoid and never allow in my home.

For those that don’t live with food allergies or sensitivities, this may seem like a blessing. But when as a whole, I begin to see signs and symptoms that may indicate distress among myself and my kids, I know it’s due to the over-consumption of processed foods.

Parker’s eczema has returned and although I’d hoped he’d be rash free on his first day of 7th grade, we haven’t been able to rid him of a few patches. Now, granted, he’s been swimming a lot and spending time outside in public areas with tons of grass, trees, and dogs around (all of which he is still allergic to). But he’s also been eating a lot of refined carbohydrates and drinking beverages with high-fructose corn syrup.

I could avoid sharing these details with the world, but the struggle is real. It’s not easy sticking to the ideal diet of select carbohydrates, clean meats, and plenty of fresh vegetables. Especially when my older teenage boys both end up with their first jobs at fast-food restaurants!

Back-to-School Means Back to Healthy!

So what is a mom to do? First, getting my husband to support the transition back to a Paleo-based diet at home is crucial. Since he experienced feeling better on a gluten-free diet last winter, this shouldn’t be too hard.

Second, between my own gluten sensitivity and our oldest son most likely having Celiac, we really need to remove gluten from the house to avoid cross-contamination.

This only leaves our middle son a “victim” due to his ability to eat anything. Yet, I believe he will also feel better, have more control over his hyperactive personality and do better in school.

However, to avoid burn out on my part, this is going to be a transition. School starts tomorrow so my plan is for the month of September, to focus on breakfast and dinner at home and allow the two boys without Celiac to eat school lunches. As fall approaches, I will assess the results and go from there.

Time to dust off my Paleo cook books and make a meal plan for the week.

Questions for you …

How hard is it for you to stick with a strict diet for yourself or your child(children) with dietary restrictions?

Do you find the medical community in support of extreme diet adjustments or are they indifferent to anything not backed by extensive research?

If you have a larger family or teens, I’d love to know of the ways you’ve been successful in feeding your family and encouraging healthy choices when not at home.

Advertisements

Candex May Help with Sugar Digestion

Epiphany Regarding Increased Sugar Tolerance in My Daughter

First of all, I want to express my sincere sympathy for those families suffering as a result of the Sucraid shortage. Our family has a high enough sucrose tolerance that we are able to use enzyme supplements from various nutritional companies to offset any excess sugar consumption. Though we all experience mild to moderate symptoms when we eat foods containing added sucrose (mostly cane sugar as we avoid high fructose corn syrup when possible). I won’t pretend to relate to those who have ZERO TOLERANCE TO SUGARS, even in natural foods such as fruit or root vegetables.

However, I wanted to share a ray of hope! My oldest daughter, diagnosed with CSID at 14, has always had very low sugar tolerance. She is still able to have some starches and grains in moderation, so she can take in enough carb-based calories. One of her chronic symptoms associated with CSID is recurring yeast infections. Since this form of yeast (Candida albicans) thrives on starch and sugar, I believe finding a way to minimize the overgrowth of this yeast could help curb this issue.

She is currently 22 years old a pregnant and I was concerned that she wouldn’t be getting enough calories once typical cravings set in. For us, I’ve noticed a pattern that leads to craving food we shouldn’t eat the more we partake in sugary or starchy foods. It’s actually not just a theory — sugar is an addictive substance. Especially the processed, white form.

Candex Enzymes for Intestinal HealthAnyway, before I go off on an anti-sugar rant, my daughter is an adult and makes her own choices. But I recently learned of a supplement, containing mostly enzymes, that supports digestive health by targeting the specific types of cells that make up Candida albicans. As a bonus, this supplement also contains Amylase, Invertase, and Glucomylase.– the enzymes that break down different forms of sugar!

CANDEX is manufactured by Pure Essence Labs and sold through various online retailers including Energetic Nutrition (my former employer and currently still a freelance client – but I get no form of compensation for mentioning this product).

After checking with her doctor and getting approval to take while pregnant, my daughter started taking Candex about a month ago. In a totally unrelated conversation a little over a week ago, she asked me if I’d ever heard of someone with CSID who experienced a higher tolerance to sugar while pregnant.

I told her honestly, I hadn’t been in touch with many adults with CSID or discussed their diets in enough detail to know. Then it occurred to me that she had been taking Candex (be it not consistently and not even on an empty stomach as recommended by the manufacturer). This is totally theory based on one individual, but this supplement may actually be helping my daughter to have a higher tolerance to sucrose! She had also lost weight in her first trimester but has gained 6 pounds in the past month.

Now, I don’t condone or encourage regular consumption of sugary foods – especially when the food itself only offers empty calories and no nutritional value. But I would like to offer this as a possible help in assisting with sucrose digestion.

Can Candex HELP THOSE WITH CSID?

The only way to know the answer to this is for others to be willing to try it. If the manufacturer can claim it is safe for pregnant women and children (note this is not a medical claim as they are not citing a specific disease), there is theoretically little risk.

However, I can only say that Candex appears to be helping in my own family. But if – and this is a BIG IF – others were willing to try it after consulting their health care provider or dietitian, and then to share the result in a comment on this blog, then maybe the answer could help others.

Side Note on the Differences Between FDA-Approved Drugs and Nutritional Supplements

Nutritional supplements (such as Candex) are not approved by the FDA. One reason being the loopholes supplement companies would have to jump through (current Sucraid shortage point in case) to get approval. Another being that the natural ingredients that comprise supplements vary due to them being – well – natural  and not created in a lab. And a third reason is that the FDA only approves DRUGS used to treat disease or symptoms of disease. They don’t approve natural remedies that can help prevent imbalances that may lead to disease, or bring a body back into balance after experiencing illness or stress. FDA approval does NOT mean that the drug is safe or doesn’t have side-effects. It means that they have determined the benefits of a drug outweigh the risks or side-effects in taking it.

With that said, there are many nutritional supplement companies out there that have gone above and beyond in order to show consumers that they can manufacture products of high-quality and with safety standards. This means using pure ingredients, minimal fillers or additives, and testing for quality. But no matter how many trials or scientific studies may indicate a certain supplement may help with a specific health issue, they are not permitted to make a medical claim in describing their product.

This is a nutshell explanation and is actually very complicated. But I’ve spent the better part of the past year having to re-write product descriptions for Energetic Nutrition to comply with this standard of DSHEA (Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act). I have yet to finish revisions on this blog as a result, but I wanted to explain that any vague or non-specific descriptions are a result of this Act.

Your thoughts?

I’d love to hear your thoughts and questions about taking supplements for digestive health. Regardless of how well we curb our children’s or our own diets to compensate for CSID, taking something to help support healthy digestion, or assist our bodies in reducing symptoms associated with poor digestion, seems like a smart choice to me.

QOL Responds to Sucraid Shortage – Time Sensitive!

*Please note this is time sensitive information. Updates will be posted as they are available.

Sucraid Shortage and QOL Response Summary

SUCRAID® SHORTAGE UPDATE

Conference Call with QOL Medical CEO Derick Cooper on April 13, 2016 at 2 p.m. (EST)

For current information on Sucraid and QOL updates, visit the following websites:

The following are highlights and follow-up on Q&A from the Conference Call

The listed questions were provided to Mr. Cooper in advance. Some were answered in conjunction with others during the conference call so not every question is answered precisely, but is addressed at one point or another. I’ve noted a reference to the answer for another question when it applies.

(Note: I’ve done my best to present this information in an objective manner and to state the information provided by Mr. Cooper as accurately as possible for informational purposes only.)

  1. Could QOL Medical clarify the reason for the shortage? Is it related to a combination of factors or primarily one?
    Information known prior to the conference:
    a) Ingredient related: The FDA website statement mentions “shortage related to unavailable approved active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) from a supplier due to requirements related to complying with good manufacturing process.”
    b) New facility and production related: Letter by QOL Medical CEO March 2016 mentions the construction of an entire new facility and transfer of production to entirely new building.
    ANSWER: Mr. Cooper further explained the change in facilities was to transfer the production of the primary ingredient in Sucraid – sacrosidase – from a food-grade manufacturing facility to a pharmaceutical-grade facility per FDA request.
  2. Reason behind the decision to change production which resulted in the shortage: Sucraid has been produced for years and used by patients for 17+ years. If the formulation hasn’t changed at all, what happened now, to get us to where we are now?
    ANSWER: Sacrosidase originally made in a food-grade facility that no longer met pharmaceutical standards. QOL has rebuilt a new facility to meet all current standards. They are working on details for final approval to begin manufacturing with FDA. Although the production of the ingredient met FDA requirements prior to this change, QOL is now  “migrating manufacturing to meet modern standards”. Mr. Cooper mentioned that there are “items” to finalize with FDA within the week,  but did not mention what those details were.
    According to Mr. Cooper, the  requirements to manufacture pharmaceutical-grade products involve two steps: 1) Tests of ingredient itself after processing to ensure that the product still effective, and no contaminants were introduced  during the process. 2) Manufacturing process itself is very complicated. Mr. Cooper did his best to describe the general steps involved as an example to demonstrate the details and steps involved in the migration. They start with a lot of yeast, then extract the sacrosidase from the yeast and filter multiple times to ensure only sacrosidase is left in a pure form. The filter must be checked by outside vendor who has valid methods for checking filter. Each part of this process needs to be documented and submitted to the FDA. QOL has made valiant efforts to follow these procedures and paperwork requirements the entire time. FDA regulations are ever-changing and do not always apply to each specific product produced. These guidelines are subject to interpretation, and QOL has done their best to interpret the guidelines according to the specific process and manufacturing of sacrosidase (Sucraid). The FDA and QOL are working together to expedite the process as much as possible.
  3. What does QOL Medical see as the current status of the shortage? Can you expand on the below information?
    Information known prior to the conference:
    a) Letter by QOL Medical CEO March 2016 mentions “we have built this new facility, transferred the manufacturing process, begun production, and filed the necessary regulatory application with the FDA for approval. We have produced Sucraid® in the new facility and are awaiting final regulatory approvals for distribution.”
    b) Calls to Sucraid Assist / One Patient Services mentioned new facility has already produced Sucraid but that those lots have not been FDA approved.
    c) Accredo representative has stated the shortage prolongation is due to the FDA not approving an ingredient in Sucraid.
    To clarify, it was the production of the main ingredient, sacrosidase within a food-grade facility the FDA decided needed to take place in a pharmaceutical-grade facility which promoted the changes. QOL did not anticipate the building and transfer to new facilities taking so long, which is the assumed reason they did not manufacture enough Sucraid prior to the transfer to meet the demand. This is my interpretation of what seemed to be implied by Mr. Cooper.
  4. FDA states they are awaiting information from QOL in order to approve Sucraid lots. What are they waiting for? As of today, all paperwork has been turned in and inspection of facility is complete. There are a few minor details (not specified by Derek) that will be address tomorrow (April 14, 2016)  in a meeting between QOL and FDA for final resolution.
    ANSWER: At the time of the phone conference, FDA had completed a full inspection of the new facility and QOL had completed and submitted all required paperwork.
  5. Does QOL anticipate a foreseeable end date to shortage?
    ANSWER: Though this could not be answered precisely, Mr. Cooper said it could take up to 2-3 months before Sucraid is available again, but he was hopeful it would be sooner.
  6. Can QOL Medical provide an estimated timeline for a resolution of the shortage in terms of weeks, months or longer? Patients would like to know if they should plan to be without Sucraid for a short, medium or long period of time. They are cognizant any specific timeline is unlikely as it will invariably change.
    See ANSWER TO #5.
  7. How can the most vulnerable patients be prioritized to receive any available, or first available, Sucraid? For the families who have quit using Sucraid to make it more available to more at risk patients, how will it be communicated to us that there is enough to begin using it again?
    There are some units left they are saving for these patients according to dire need, however they will not use this supply if they are able to begin manufacturing a new batch soon.
  8. Does QOL have any data about other medications that experienced a similar facility approval related shortage situation? If so, what was the timeframe for those similar cases to be resolved? When it is released, it will be available within a week of FDA approval. NA
  9. Can QOL confirm that all Sucraid that has been currently released is only done with full FDA approval?
    Information known prior to the conference:
    a) That there are NO unapproved lots in circulation.
    b) That Sucraid lots requiring an informed consent listed additional possible risks but were still approved as safe to be released by the FDA.
    c) That current Sucraid is safe to use and that all possible risks have been fully disclosed in writing to patients. That neither QOL nor the FDA has hidden any important information from them.
    d) FDA stated this clearly in the teleconference, but the point seems to have still been confused by other external statements on the call and noise distraction.
    Details related to this question were not addressed specifically enough for me to confirm or deny the details.
  10. Even though it was FDA approved as safe to use with informed consent, What were the specific contaminants that were identified or posed as possible risks?
    ANSWER: I asked Mr. Cooper to clarify this once the call was opened to questions. If I understood him correctly, it was the “manufacturing of sacrosidase” that no longer met FDA requirements. There was NOT any contamination of the ingredient.

It’s possible the FDA was concerned the food-grade facility could lead to a risk which is why they prompted the move to new pharmaceutical grade facilities, but this inference was not made by Mr. Cooper himself.

ADDITIONAL DETAILS SHARED DURING THE CALL

To clarify the frustration of one parent on why they were not informed of the possible shortage in advance, Mr. Cooper explained that QOL doesn’t have the ability to directly contact patients due to HIPPA.

Possible Solutions to Communicating with Parents and Patients in the future  Not Explored during the call: Communicating in general with pharmacies, doctors, or insurance companies OR placing a notice in the packaging of Sucraid when this process started, letting patients know that a shortage was possible.

In answer to another caller’s question, Mr. Cooper clarified that this transfer to new facilities would not impact the cost of Sucraid or change any current programs designed to assist families in need.

Mr. Cooper ended the call by stating that QOL would love to hear stories about how Sucraid has made a difference. Again, they are doing all they can to expedite this approval process as soon as possible, and they are deeply sorry for the issues this shortage has caused to families.

Getting diagnosed with CSID as an adult or teen

As difficult as it is for parents to adjust to feeding their young child with a recent CSID diagnosis, suspecting or receiving a CSID diagnosis is even harder as a teen or adult. Babies and young children have the advantage of never knowing a life of consuming excess sugar or starch. If regulated and monitored, they will at least know how beneficial living without these foods can be. Even if they experiment as older teens or adults, they will quickly learn their tolerance levels and have their childhood lessons on proper food choices to fall back on

My miserable teen years

I often reflect back to my teen years and a point where I was so frustrated from getting an upset stomach or gas every time I ate, I wished I could just take a pill to satisfy my hunger. Eating has rarely been a pleasure for me. I used to blame it on stress alone, and I’m sure stress played a part, but if I had only known how to curb some of my common eating habits at a younger age – I wonder how different my life would look now.

You see, it wasn’t until after two of my children were diagnosed with CSID and I decided I would only eat what they could as I began experimenting with recipes, that I realized I, too, likely had CSID. But that was back in 2007 when I was a stay-at-home-mom and my time and financial resources were plenty.

Confirming what I already knew

Finally, a visit with the genetics department and a GI doctor back in 2014 confirmed my suspicions. However, there still wasn’t a pill out there that could help my cause! I had to make a daily choice – meal by meal – and avoid those foods I knew were harmful to me. I also learned that if I chose to continue consuming gluten or sugar (at that point I thought that moderation wouldn’t hurt me) – that it could lead to other problems. Eventually I realized my fibromyalgia symptoms were linked to gluten and sugar consumption as well. Beyond stomach upset, consuming taboo foods could also trigger a flare-up of chronic pain, severe PMS, or a migraine that lasted for days.

Bad habits die hard

But curbing poor eating habits and fighting the urge to consume what’s in front of me (especially when hunger demanded I eat something) is easier said than done. Despite knowing I am setting an example for my teenage and adult children (they are ages 12-22 as of the date of this post), I still give in on occasion – and always pay a price.

However, after experiencing a horrible migraine the day before heading off on a week-long writer’s conference at the end of March, my resolve strengthened. Enough is enough – I must learn to care for my own digestive health in hopes that my children will see me benefiting and make their own wise choices. (See PREPARING FOR THE 21-DAY SUGAR DETOX  to read more on my own commitment to change.)

A new reason to get well – I’m going to be a grandmother!

My oldest daughter is pregnant and constantly hungry  while she and her husband balance working 2 jobs each. Now that we are living close to each other, I desire to model proper eating habits regardless of the chaos of life. With a grandchild on the way, my motivation is stronger than ever. I want to be healthy and capable of spending as much time with him or her as possible!

 

Digestive Enzyme Deficiency Support

During the better part of the past year, I have had the privilege of working for an online retailer of various brands of high-quality supplements. Part of my job has been to write or rewrite their blog content and one of my first projects was to write a blog on digestive enzyme deficiency. My boss was eager for me to share my knowledge related to CSID with their general readership and we both learned a lot in the process.

I have posted the first part here with a link to read the entire article on the Energetic Nutrition blog.

Finding Support for Digestive Enzyme Deficiency

More than Occasional Tummy Troubles

A healthy, fully functioning digestive system provides essential detoxification, immune system support, and energy from the proper breakdown of food. It is a well-known fact that over 70% of our immune system is located in our digestive tract.

Many times symptoms of compromised digestion do not become apparent until disease or chronic illness are present.

If the digestive system is unable to function properly, various symptoms can surface from something as simple as occasional stomach ache, acid indigestion, or flatulence to more serious chronic conditions such as food allergies or digestive disease.

When digestive problems begin to interfere with everyday life, a quick, over-the-counter solution may be the first line of defense. However, these remedies often only cover up symptoms and do not address the root of digestive distress. For long-term results, adding digestive enzyme supplements can provide the body with added digestive support in addition to alleviating symptoms.

CONTINUE READING AT ENERGETIC NUTRITION/BLOG

Managing CSID when time and money are limited

Challenges of CSID during life changes

Over the past 18 months or so, our family has endured many challenges. Sticking with the ideal food and supplement choices has not only been hard, but impossible at times. I’ve had to allow compromises, only to see my children or myself suffer as a result. And as much as I want to be that “perfect” example for all those parents or adults out there struggling with a recent CSID or GSID diagnosis – I also want them to know there will always be challenges.

Yet, because of all the knowledge and experience I have gained from trial and error, and understanding from resources that focus on providing our bodies with digestive support – I am hopeful that in time we will get back on track.

I am also learning how different each CSID case is – along with how close relatives may experience various levels of carbohydrate intolerance, autoimmune diseases, or mild digestive upset. As of today, 4 of my 5 children as well as my husband recognize associated symptoms when they choose to partake in food containing sugar, starch, or dairy products. In June, my 17 year-old son, Dawson, received a Celiac Disease diagnosis after several unexplained events related to inflamed joints. (See Our CSID Story and scroll down to 1999 to read how we’ve had warning signs since he was young). I will write a separate post about the challenges and blessings that have resulted from this diagnosis. Ultimately, we are learning that our entire family should avoid sugar (processed, artificial, or corn syrup based), starch (from wheat and most grains), or dairy (except grass-fed organic on occasion) as much as possible.

And this is really the purpose behind my blog and my book A Place to Start Without Sugar or Starch. It’s about knowing we are not alone in this daily battle. It’s about understanding we will fail at times, but that it is possible to gain ground again and seek out the resources and answers that can provide a lifestyle of true health and wellness again

Here are my most recent tips to providing CSID-friendly meals while on the go and on a tight budget!

Tips for quick and easy CSID Meals

For some of these meals, a digestive enzyme may be required to help the individual process any naturally occurring sugars or starches. Choose one options per bullet point and modify them as needed.

Breakfast

  • Nitrate-free bacon with a semi-ripe banana, one slice of gluten-free toast (Schar brand is also egg free!)
  • Sweet potato (we use the light ones with white flesh) hash browns with chopped tomatoes and egg prepared as desired
  • Gluten-free, non-GMO cold cereal with unsweetened almond milk (digestive enzymes recommended)
  • Bob’s Red Mill Rice Farina (super excited to have recently discovered this as Cream of Wheat used to be our favorite years ago!) NOTE: This contains approximately 32 grams of starch per 1/4 cup, yet for unknown reasons everyone in our family seems to tolerate any food derived from brown rice very well.

Lunch/Snack

  • Raw almonds
  • KIND bars granola bars (gluten-free and non-GMO)
  • Unsweetened applesauce or semi-sweet fruit such as strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, grapes, or red pears.
  • Nitrate-free, gluten-free lunch meat sandwich on gluten-free bread (we use smashed avocado in place of mayo due to Parker’s egg white allergy)
  • Tuna salad (albacore, wild-caught tuna blended with avocado, olive oil, sea salt and a dash of white vinegar on a bed of romaine lettuce with black olives and grape tomatoes)
  • Non-GMO peanut or almond butter sandwich or cup with celery. We use Simply Fruit jam or honey.
  • Non-GMO chips (moderation recommended if they contain corn ingredients)
  • Fresh bite-sized, non-starchy veggies such as sugar snap peas, celery, cucumber

Dinner

  • Brown rice pasta with organic spaghetti sauce (if buying jarred sauce, check ingredients carefully), with ground turkey or grass-fed ground beef
  • Sweet potato skillet (1 pound ground turkey, beef, or leftover chicken plus 2-3 white sweet potatoes shredded or sliced and cooked until crispy, and a steamed vegetable such as green beans or broccoli). On occassion, we use brown rice in place of sweet potatoes.
  • Crockpot chicken with fresh rosemary, sea salt, and pepper. Add carrots, red potatoes, or non-GMO brown rice. Add sliced oranges or fresh cranberries if desired.
  • Most Thai or Asian meals are easy to duplicate at home and many Thai Kitchen products and recipes are suitable.
  • White bean turkey chili

 

This is what happens to your body if you drink warm honey-lemon water in the morning

Photos, Hodgepodge and Miscellany

This is what happens to your body if you drink warm honey-lemon water in the morning

Adding lemon to water not only quenches thirst better than any other beverage, but it also nourishes our body with vitamins, minerals and trace elements which we absolutely need. Lemon with water can be considered the best natural energy booster. When we wake up in the morning, our bodily tissues are dehydrated and are in need of water to push out toxins and rejuvenate the cells. In other words, this homemade “lemonade” helps eliminate internal toxins, regulating proper kidney and digestive tract functions by forcing them to work as smoothly as possible.

20 Unbelievable Reasons To Start Your Day With Water and Lemon

  1. Water with lemon provides the body with electrolytes which hydrate your body. As lemons contain good amount of electrolytes such as potassium, calcium and magnesium.
  2. Water with lemon is good for…

View original post 588 more words

Complete Chewable Enzymes also help with Sucrose Digestion

Back in December (I cannot BELIEVE it has been that long since my last post!) I threw up a quick photo of these new enzymes my sister found. I have not had any time to update everyone on how Parker has fared with this new supplement.

I am happy to say–so far so good! He takes 1 or 2 chewables every time he eats, and sometimes that is 5 or 6 times per day. We got through Christmas with natural-sugar-based and died candies, as well as other foods containing sucrose such as ketchup. BUT before anyone gets excited due to the <$30 per bottle price-tag, the Holidays are over!!

Here is the link to the enzymes: Vital-ZymesTM Chewables , but I am not encouraging the consumption of sugar with their use. There are several other benefits to this product that will support digestion and all the related organ function as a whole. I encourage you to read all the literature on the website before ordering.

I am going to be putting up several more posts on our upcoming 21-day Sugar Detox, based on the best-selling book by Diane Sanfilippo as both Parker and I embark on this cleansing process and make a commitment to a pure Paleo living lifestyle.

Although Parker doesn’t eat sugar (aside from the occasional added ingredient to some packaged foods we are soon putting the taboo on)– he has been craving sweets A LOT lately. I will go into my thinking as to why in future posts. His lingering rashes are one indication he is still experiencing some imbalance. More to come this weekend as I share more about my own personal struggles with food and self-control regarding sugar.

New Enzymes with Sucrase!

My sister came across these while doing research for her nutrition class. We are giving them a try now that Parker’s eczema is under control. Although he still showing some symptoms, we believe it’s mostly environmental. As of yesterday this will be the only digestive support he will take until the bottle is gone.

I will continue to give Parker his antihistamine at night, and apply the prescription ointment for topical treatment. For the record here is a picture I took of him yesterday when we were baking gingerbread cookies gluten free of course.

They are available through various Amazon sellers. Simply search: “Klaire Labs Vital-Zymes chewable”

As you can see he still has some irritation around his eye and some spots on his neck…but huge improvement over all.

CSID, Eczema and Additional Food Allergies

I have some frustrating news. After over six months of Parker’s eczema flaring up, I finally took him to the doctor and requested a food allergy screening. Something else had to be irritating his system since he hadn’t been in school for an entire month, I was watching his diet very closely, and trying to keep his skin moist with a variety of creams and lotions. (See the bottom of the post for photos.) I did not want to continue the steroid cream, especially when the rash had spread to his neck and face. And I wasn’t going to give him another dose of antibiotics no matter what she said. But, the only way to know for sure if he was still eating something that was aggravating his system, was to get the allergy screening ordered through his doctor.

While waiting for the results, I asked our chiropractor if the colloidal silver he had mentioned a few weeks back could help with the infection, so I didn’t have to put Parker back on antibiotics again. He said it most definitely would. Within 48 hours, most of the oozing and irritated areas were drying up nicely. Read more about how I have addressed the topical healing HERE. I wrote a brief product review through my work blog last week on this topic alone.

Within a few days, the allergy results came back. To my dismay, he is now allergic to the following:

  • egg whites (a look at my recipes and you will know why this one made me cry!)
  • milk (sorry buddy, no more cheese or sour cream)
  • wheat (not a surprise)
  • shrimp
  • cockroaches (um…what? you say… guess what cockroaches are used for? FOOD DYE!)
  • penicillin (yah, so my hesitation about antibiotics will no longer be challenged!)
  • cat and dog hair and dander
  • timothy grass
  • cedar
The good news? The Paleo diet support the omission of most of these foods, so I was on the right track. The challenge: not using eggs. After attempting to feed our entire family according to these limitations over the past couple of weeks, I realized this is not possible with my limited time and resources.
My compromise? I purchased some gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free baking mixes (despite having high-starch content)… for the purpose of baking Parker a variety of “treats” he can have in place of the bread, milk, etc. that the rest of the family can eat.
I just can’t bear for him to be starving all the time. We are all pretty small people to begin with and we have lost far too much weight consuming Paleo foods alone. I realize quantity is a factor, but I need to find a happy medium. Costco is now selling many products that are organic and gluten-free. A relief (kind of ) to my food budget. So, I will be including non-gmo brown rice, Bob’s Red Mill gluten-free baking mix with Ener-G egg-substitute into our weekly menu plan. 
Parker will continue to take his Sucraid and Food Enzymes to assist with sugar and starch digestion.
As far as his eczema, we have been experiencing triple-digit heat here in the Sacramento Valley. I am trying to keep him indoors and we are swimming in fresh water to avoid lake contaminants and chlorine. He is also drinking 22 ounces of Chlorophyll Cocktail and a cup of Dandelion Root tea each day. There are parts of his body where the rash is clearing up, but other parts (primarily the ones he keeps scratching) keep getting irritated again.
I know it’s a process and it could take months to flush out whatever is stressing out his system. My hope though, is that we can get the rash under control before school starts again. And that his new teacher is willing to help make him comfortable and encourage him to make wise choices.
PHOTOS (for comparison purposes)