CSID Cookie Recipe for Nursing Moms

I just had to share this recipe that came through my work in-box. I have not tried it myself, so please post comments regarding any adjustments or opinions for how this works for your family. My comments are shown between { … }

Gluten Free Lactation Cookie
Created by Jennifer at HybridRastaMama.com

{This recipe if for nursing mothers to consume, not for toddlers or children with CSID, unless you have tested individual ingredients and understand your child’s tolerance levels.}

Ingredients
·         1 tablespoons fenugreek to make 4 T brewed fenugreek tea
·         2 tablespoons flaxseed meal
·         1 cup Kelapo Coconut Oil, melted
·         3/4 cup raw honey
·         2 eggs
·         3 teaspoons vanilla
·         3/4 cup peanut butter or other nut/seed butter (I really like sunflower seed butter in these) {unsweetened almond butter}
·         1/2 cup coconut flour, sifted OR 2 cups gluten free all-purpose flour
·         4 tablespoons nutritional yeast
·         2 teaspoons aluminum free baking powder
·         1 teaspoon sea salt
·         3 1/2 cups gluten free oats {if starch is an issue, try 3 cups almond flour}
·         1/2 – 3/4 cup raisins or dried cranberries (optional)
·         1/2 – 3/4 cup chocolate chips (optional) {omit with first batch to test tolerance without}

Directions
1.      Preheat oven to 325 degrees

2.      Brew fenugreek in 8 ounces of hot water until grains are soft.

3.      Mix flaxseed and 4 tablespoons fenugreek tea and let sit for 3-5 minutes. DO NOT DISCARD THE GRAINS!

4.      Beat coconut oil and honey.

5.      Add eggs and vanilla and mix well.

6.      Fold in the peanut butter/nut or seed butter until well combined.

7.      Add flaxseed mix and fenugreek grains and mix well.

8.      Add flour, nutritional yeast, baking powder, and salt. Mix and if using coconut flour see ingredient notes below.*

9.      Mix in oats until well combined.

10.    If using raisins or cranberries and/or chocolate chips, slowly fold these in.

11.    Round off a large tablespoon of dough and place on cookie sheet. Press it down slightly.

12.    Bake for 15 minutes then check cookies. Continue baking (checking every 3 minutes) until the outside is a bit brown with crispy edges. The inside should still be slightly moist and soft.

13.    Let cool on cookie sheet for a few minutes and transfer to a cooling rack.

Ingredient Notes
1. Coconut flour has the tendency to soak up a ton of liquid. Every brand varies. If your batter seems dry at this point, add in a tablespoon at a time of coconut milk or your other favorite milk until the consistency is more doughy and moist. If you overdo it, add in sifted coconut flour in 2 teaspoon increments.

2. This batter is really sticky! Do not try to form dough balls with your hands. It will be a mess. A yummy mess at least! I like to grease my spoon with a little coconut oil. It helps the dough slide right off!

3. This recipe is not incredibly sweet although if you use the dried fruit or chocolate chips it does sweeten up! If you prefer a really sweet cookie, add some additional honey and/or vanilla. For every 1/4 cup of honey you add, you will need to increase the coconut flour by 2 tablespoons and the oats by 2 tablespoons.

4. The reason that honey is used and not sugar is because honey has tremendous health properties which a mother can pass on to her breastfeeding infant. Unless you are allergic to honey, please do not substitute the honey with sugar.

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Breastfeeding and CSID Research and Surveys

I am collecting information regarding breastfeeding, digestive health in general and the CSID connection. To date, there is no documented research indicating that children with CSID present any symptoms prior to beginning solid foods. However, my son Parker DID show signs of failure to thrive, suffered from seizures and presented other symptoms related to CSID long before he had anything but breast milk.

Breastfeeding to strengthen digestive health

According to some studies on breast milk in general, the oligosaccharides found in human breast milk can reduce or prevent diarrhea. This information got me to thinking how my son, Parker, never had full-blown diarrhea, though his BMs were always oily, very smelly, and bulky compared to my other breastfed children. As many of you mothers out there know, breastfed infants rarely produce smelly BMs. Usually the “stink starts” when other food is introduced!

As a result, I would like to gather some more information in order to write a detailed article which touches on CSID, but reaches a broader audience of mothers who may not recognize this additional benefit to breastfeeding their child. Though CSID cannot be prevented by breastfeeding, my hunch is that it can definitely protect your child from developing other digestive diseases or infections due to an imbalanced gut. There is already proof that breastfeeding can have a “protective affect”on children susceptible to Celiac Disease.

Breastfeeding may have prevented my son from becoming severely dehydrated

When I think back to just before Parker was diagnosed with CSID, I recall the week before seeing his GI, he was very sick and lethargic. He was having several BMs, several in an hour at times, but nothing that appeared to be diarrhea. After receiving his diagnosis, I discovered that many children with CSID are hospitalized due to dehydration. Though Parker was hospitalized several times, the reason was always due to his seizures, not his digestive woes. Since I breastfed Parker until he was about 14 months old, adding only some solid food at nine months (most of which I removed from his diet since nearly everything seemed to exacerbate or increase his symptoms), I fully credit the benefits of breast milk as the sole reason he was never hospitalized for dehydration. However, breastfeeding may also have been the reason for his delayed diagnosis given it may have prevented the severe diarrhea that would have demanded the doctors attention!

Share your CSID and breastfeeding story connections

Of course, this theory cannot be proven for our particular circumstance. However, if we can band together and share our stories related to breastfeeding (or not) and try to find a connection, we may be able to help that child and mother facing undiagnosed digestive issues.

You will see two surveys posted on the left side of this blog. If you have a child with CSID or you suspect CSID or another digestive issue is the cause of your child’s health problems, please select the survey answers that best represent your situation. If you are interested in sharing your story in more detail, please respond by commenting on this post or by sending me an email.

Thank you so much for your support on this important topic!