Getting diagnosed with CSID as an adult or teen

As difficult as it is for parents to adjust to feeding their young child with a recent CSID diagnosis, suspecting or receiving a CSID diagnosis is even harder as a teen or adult. Babies and young children have the advantage of never knowing a life of consuming excess sugar or starch. If regulated and monitored, they will at least know how beneficial living without these foods can be. Even if they experiment as older teens or adults, they will quickly learn their tolerance levels and have their childhood lessons on proper food choices to fall back on

My miserable teen years

I often reflect back to my teen years and a point where I was so frustrated from getting an upset stomach or gas every time I ate, I wished I could just take a pill to satisfy my hunger. Eating has rarely been a pleasure for me. I used to blame it on stress alone, and I’m sure stress played a part, but if I had only known how to curb some of my common eating habits at a younger age – I wonder how different my life would look now.

You see, it wasn’t until after two of my children were diagnosed with CSID and I decided I would only eat what they could as I began experimenting with recipes, that I realized I, too, likely had CSID. But that was back in 2007 when I was a stay-at-home-mom and my time and financial resources were plenty.

Confirming what I already knew

Finally, a visit with the genetics department and a GI doctor back in 2014 confirmed my suspicions. However, there still wasn’t a pill out there that could help my cause! I had to make a daily choice – meal by meal – and avoid those foods I knew were harmful to me. I also learned that if I chose to continue consuming gluten or sugar (at that point I thought that moderation wouldn’t hurt me) – that it could lead to other problems. Eventually I realized my fibromyalgia symptoms were linked to gluten and sugar consumption as well. Beyond stomach upset, consuming taboo foods could also trigger a flare-up of chronic pain, severe PMS, or a migraine that lasted for days.

Bad habits die hard

But curbing poor eating habits and fighting the urge to consume what’s in front of me (especially when hunger demanded I eat something) is easier said than done. Despite knowing I am setting an example for my teenage and adult children (they are ages 12-22 as of the date of this post), I still give in on occasion – and always pay a price.

However, after experiencing a horrible migraine the day before heading off on a week-long writer’s conference at the end of March, my resolve strengthened. Enough is enough – I must learn to care for my own digestive health in hopes that my children will see me benefiting and make their own wise choices. (See PREPARING FOR THE 21-DAY SUGAR DETOX  to read more on my own commitment to change.)

A new reason to get well – I’m going to be a grandmother!

My oldest daughter is pregnant and constantly hungry  while she and her husband balance working 2 jobs each. Now that we are living close to each other, I desire to model proper eating habits regardless of the chaos of life. With a grandchild on the way, my motivation is stronger than ever. I want to be healthy and capable of spending as much time with him or her as possible!

 

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