Going Paleo {Paleo + CSID Part 1}

Sausage, Egg, and Sweet Potato Breakfast Skillet{EveryDayPaleo.com}
Within a few weeks of finalizing A Place to Start Without Sugar or Starch for printing, I started noticing the word “paleo” popping up on my favorite food blogs and on cookbook covers in the health food stores. After researching dozens of other diets that involved a low-carb approach, I honestly did not feel like looking into one more. In the long run I did want to refine my CSID approach, but time and other resources were lacking.
Knowing I was close to eating as healthy as possible with my CSID diet plan, I figured I needed to master the meal planning for my family first. Then I would look into this paleo thing in time and see if it would work in light of CSID.
In my last post I mentioned that I needed to focus on my own health and well-being, which I am still working on. However, with Parker’s eczema worse than ever and my migraines lasting more than 5 days, I was feeling desperate for a natural, long-term approach to our health. We had compromised our diet due to time and money constraints. But I was feeling so lousy, it made it hard to utilize what resources I did have in the best way possible. By this time I had made a note to take a closer look at the paleo diet. After all the compromising of processed foods into our diet, I figured we didn’t have much to lose. Something had to change.
First, though, I had to kick the migraines. I decided to see a chiropractor since the last thing I wanted was to add another medication to my nightstand. I had worked hard to remove most of them over the past 18 months. And I knew pills were not the answer to repairing the imbalance in my body. They were just giving me temporary relief.
I was fortunate enough to visit a chiropractor who uses a whole body approach to healing. From what I gather, he sees his care as just a part of the overall lifestyle change anyone needs to feel well. I had long believed in the theory of chiropractic care, but had not sought treatment since the onset of my Fibromyalgia symptoms back in 2011. I was in too much pain back then to consider getting adjusted.
After a week of treatment and a few tests, the Doctor concluded several things about my state of health.
1. My “normal” was so far from actually feeling well, I couldn’t comprehend what well felt like.
2. I have moderate scoliosis, and impairments in the top and bottom of my spine.
3. With an aggressive treatment plan, plus diet and exercise changes, I actually have a chance to feel great for probably the first time in over 20 years.
Parker was also assessed and the Doctor believes his eczema and his headaches are due to issues in his skeletal system. He doesn’t claim to be able to reverse the CSID, but does believe once Parker is aligned properly, it is possible his overall health will improve drastically.
The chiropractor also fully believes the paleo diet is part of the solution.
That was my tipping point. I needed to set aside my own theories and trust that someone with over 20 years of experience treating people successfully could have the answers I had been searching for.
My first step would be to look into paleo and see if it would work for us in light of CSID. It only took a few minutes for me to see how similar the diet is to CSID-friendly foods. Though Parker and I are in a state of distress, we are not presenting major digestive symptoms. Considering this confession, this is my plan for our family:
1. Since we have already been compromising with starches and grains, I am not going to be concerned with included higher-starch foods from the paleo menu such as cashews, pecans, and winter squashes.
2. I am going to wean us off of most of our digestive enzymes. The paleo diet includes mostly digestive friendly foods, so as long as we include a plentiful amount of raw fruits and vegetables, we should not need help digesting most of the foods. The exception will be to include Sucraid with the sweeter fruits allowed, such as papayas and melons, or dried fruits.
3. We will all be removing some of our most favorite foods over time. The idea is that if we eat 80-90% paleo most of the time, we can occasionally “cheat” with few ill affect. On the other hand, literature on paleo suggests the longer we comply with the permissible foods, the less we will want to eat the forbidden ones. For our family this will mean:
  • No more chips. Even organic corn which is a staple.
  • No more peanut butter. I don’t eat this as I prefer almond butter, but the hubby and kids are going to find this a hard one to completely eliminate.
  • Cutting back virtually all dairy products. Ouch! I really love my butter,cheese, and half&half!
  • No more sprouted grain bread. All grains, including corn are off the table.
Essentially Paleo includes all vegetables (except potatoes), all fruit, nuts and seeds, and animal protein such as eggs, chicken, turkey, pork, and beef raised in a healthy environment with a grain-free diet.
Paleo excludes grains (including corn), legumes (peanuts, peas, and green beans included), beans of all kinds, and dairy products. The books I reference below go into much more detail about why. Since I am a novice at this, I will not attempt to explain it myself.
4. The great thing, however, is we are already 80% there with my CSID diet approach. It will require planning and always having quick snacks on hand such as nuts, fruits, hard-boiled eggs and sliced-up veggies. My food dehydrator will probably be working overtime between drying fruit and making beef jerky.
5. By not purchasing organic dairy products, sprouted grain baked goods, gluten-free cereals, and organic peanut butter, I will save a lot of money that will go to purchasing grass-fed beef, and fresh fish and poultry.
Here are a few of the family-friendly Paleo resources I have found so far. I will be purchasing the electronic versions of the cookbooks soon and can’t wait to get started!
If, as a CSID family, you see the potential in applying the paleo diet to your household, please let me know! I will be posting recipe testimonies and linking to recipes or other resources as we find success.

If you are new to the CSID diet, or you or your child have been recently diagnosed with CSID, visit the brand new website www.CSIDcares.org for a complete description and direction for managing CSID.

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